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Judy Thorburn's Movie Reviews

Sex And The City

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Judy Thorburn

"Sex And The City" - The Movie - The Continuing Saga of New York City's Fab Four

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"SEX AND THE CITY" - THE MOVIE – THE CONTINUING SAGA OF NEW YORK CITY’S FAB FOUR

Flick Chicks Chick-O-Meter The Flick Chicks, film, video, movie reviews, critics, Judy Thorburn, Victoria Alexander, Polly Peluso, Shannon Onstot, Jacqueline Monahan, Tasha ChemplavilFlick Chicks Chick-O-Meter The Flick Chicks, film, video, movie reviews, critics, Judy Thorburn, Victoria Alexander, Polly Peluso, Shannon Onstot, Jacqueline Monahan, Tasha ChemplavilFlick Chicks Chick-O-Meter The Flick Chicks, film, video, movie reviews, critics, Judy Thorburn, Victoria Alexander, Polly Peluso, Shannon Onstot, Jacqueline Monahan, Tasha ChemplavilFlick Chicks Chick-O-Meter The Flick Chicks, film, video, movie reviews, critics, Judy Thorburn, Victoria Alexander, Polly Peluso, Shannon Onstot, Jacqueline Monahan, Tasha ChemplavilFlick Chicks Chick-O-Meter The Flick Chicks, film, video, movie reviews, critics, Judy Thorburn, Victoria Alexander, Polly Peluso, Shannon Onstot, Jacqueline Monahan, Tasha Chemplavil

Almost immediately after the Emmy Award winning HBO series Sex and the City which ran for six seasons, concluded its final original episode in 2004, there was talk of a possible big screen version on the horizon with a reunion of the four leading ladies reprising their roles. I must admit I was one of the millions of female fans who were hooked on the show. I loved it, didn’t miss a weekly episode, having invested interest in the characters. At the core of the groundbreaking series was the deep bond between four sassy, sexy, female best fiends in New York City, who shared their ups and downs (mostly concerning men), sipped cosmos, and always looked amazing in incredible fashions. There was nothing like it on the air, with its bold and daring scenes, explicit and witty dialogue. Women and gay men everywhere lived vicariously through, or wanted to be, one of the fab four.

Well, the wait is over and I couldn’t believe my eyes when I approached the theatre. There appeared to be an endless line of predominately female hardcore fans standing patiently waiting to be among the first to get into this advance screening. Unfortunately, the film started off on strange note. It was clear the projectionist was having problems with the framing. The mikes were clearly visible and seen bobbing over the heads of the actors and it was hard to get seriously involved when the distraction was creating unmeant for laughter in the audience until it was finally fixed.

Picking up four years after we left off and moving on to the next phase of their lives, we find Carrie (Sarah Jessica Parker) still deeply involved with millionaire financier Mr. Big (Chris Noth) although he still hasn’t popped the question. She is longer writing her weekly column but, instead, is working on her fourth book. Charlotte (Kristin Davis) the sweet one, is happily married to devoted and loving husband Harry (Evan Handler) and the mother of an adopted Asian child, Lilly. Smart attorney Miranda (Cynthia Nixon), who has settled in Brooklyn with her down to earth bartender husband Steve (David Eigenberg) and young son, is having a hard time balancing her career with married life. And last, but no way least, the eldest, sexually liberated PR maven Samantha (Kim Cattrall) is enjoying life in Malibu with her client and live-in lover, the much younger, hunky boy toy, Smith (Jason Lewis) when not flying back to New York to hang with her gal pals.

But all isn’t going as smoothly as it appears. Each of the girls is dealing with their own complicated issues. There are four storylines but the central focus revolves around Carrie after her man “Big” (his real name is revealed as John James Preston) buys her the ultimate dream penthouse apartment. They move in together and he suddenly surprises her with a wedding proposal which leads to Carrie making plans for her upcoming nuptials that includes selecting the perfect designer wedding gown, a photo shoot for a Vogue fashion spread (Candice Bergen makes a cameo appearance as the editor), and having the reception at the 42nd Street Library.

Meanwhile Miranda, who is too pre-occupied with work to have sex with her husband comes home one day to have him admit, out of guilt, that he had slept with another woman, but only once. Unable to forgive him, she moves out and into her own apartment. Samantha, on the other hand, is having trouble being monogamous, especially after seeing her gorgeous next door neighbor naked. It gets even worse when he makes an offer she has trouble refusing. And then there is Charlotte, who seems to have it all, but is dealing with infertility.

Without revealing everything, suffice to say there are verbal fights, breakups and of course, reconciliations, and a sideline trip to Mexico where the fab four try to forget their problems and indulge in girl bonding, emotional support, and some fun.

In the course of her unfolding storyline, Carrie winds up hiring a personal assistant to help re-organize her life when things go haywire. Enter Jennifer Hudson as Louise, a young woman with her own romantic issues to deal with, but in doing so, winds up teaching her boss some lessons in forgiveness. As a new character, Hudson’s role is pivotal to how everything comes out in the end, and I would have liked to see her character developed and given more screen time.

As for those who have never watched the show and are curious as to what the fuss was about, the film misses the mark as far as being as daring, bold, and as cutting edge as the series. Writer/director Michael Patrick King offers only occasional glimpses into those certain factors that drew fans week after week and made the show such a blast to watch. At nearly two and a half hours long audiences are given a homogenized extended episode loaded with sentimentality and forgiveness and not enough wit or sex. What holds it all together is the acting and great chemistry among the gals who rally together when one is in need of emotional support and how they are able to endure whatever conflict or inner turmoil may threaten their friendship.

One issue I have with the film is the believability when it comes to Carrie and Big. After a ten year relationship with Carrie, Big’s behavior or lack of it is not credible. He would have known that to get her attention takes just two words: Manolo Blahnik. For fashion diva Carrie, those expensive designer shoes are only second to a diamond ring and the way to her heart.

All in all, I liked the film. I just didn’t love it although I thought Miranda’s storyline was the best written and most believable and relatable for most women.

I didn’t care for the contrived Cinderella style ending, as I live in the real world. As for recommending the film, I would say yes for those who never saw the show and have nothing to compare it to.

But, for the devoted fans of the series who are anxious to see the big screen follow-up, let me add something Samantha might say; “Bigger and longer isn’t always better.”