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Judy Thorburn's Movie Reviews

You, Me And Dupree

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Judy Thorburn

You, Me And Dupree

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“YOU, ME AND DUPREE” - TOO MUCH DEBRIS IN THIS FLOUNDERING COMEDY

Flick Chicks Chick-O-Meter The Flick Chicks, film, video, movie reviews, critics, Judy Thorburn, Victoria Alexander, Polly Peluso, Shannon Onstot, Jacqueline Monahan, Tasha ChemplavilFlick Chicks Chick-O-Meter The Flick Chicks, film, video, movie reviews, critics, Judy Thorburn, Victoria Alexander, Polly Peluso, Shannon Onstot, Jacqueline Monahan, Tasha ChemplavilFlick Chicks Chick-O-Meter The Flick Chicks, film, video, movie reviews, critics, Judy Thorburn, Victoria Alexander, Polly Peluso, Shannon Onstot, Jacqueline Monahan, Tasha ChemplavilFlick Chicks Chick-O-Meter The Flick Chicks, film, video, movie reviews, critics, Judy Thorburn, Victoria Alexander, Polly Peluso, Shannon Onstot, Jacqueline Monahan, Tasha ChemplavilFlick Chicks Chick-O-Meter The Flick Chicks, film, video, movie reviews, critics, Judy Thorburn, Victoria Alexander, Polly Peluso, Shannon Onstot, Jacqueline Monahan, Tasha Chemplavil

I don’t know about you, but if I am invited to stay over at someone’s house, I never outstay my welcome and always leave it neater than my own. I want to be invited back. For me, being a messy or rude guest is unthinkable. After all, when someone kindly offers you a roof over your head, you should be respectful, appreciative, and grateful of their hospitality. It’s not a hotel with maid service. THAT you pay for.

On the other hand, Owen Wilson’s character, Randolph Dupree, who is referred to as Dupree (don’t know why) instead of Randy, doesn’t know the proper social graces. Come to think of it Wilson has been down this road before. Just last year he played a wedding crasher. In You, Me and Dupree, he goes a step further by portraying a guy who disrupts the lives of newlyweds by “crashing” at their home and being a nuisance, to put it mildly.

Dupree first arrives on the scene to be the best man at his lifelong best friend, Carl Peterson’s (Matt Dillon) wedding to Goldie’s daughter err, I mean, pretty blonde schoolteacher Molly (Kate Hudson). Zip on any chemistry between the best buds, or for that matter all three. But as quick as you can say “the honeymoon is over” Dupree, winds up being a third party in the new home of the just married couple after they find out he’s unemployed and homeless as a result of taking time off to attend their wedding. Of course, what is supposed to be just a temporary stay for a couple of days or a week at the most, starts looking like he’s moved in for good.

Dupree makes himself at home in the worst way. He’s an immature man/boy, a carefree slacker spending more time playing outdoors with the neighborhood kids, watching sports on TV, than looking for a job. Not only does he leave a mess everywhere, he stinks up the bathroom, causes the toilet to overflow, is caught in embarrassing situations such as sleeping with his naked butt exposed, masturbating, or in the middle of kinky sex with Molly’s Mormon girlfriend right on the living room couch as Molly enters the house. To make matters worse, he almost burns down the house, setting the living room on fire from the numerous candles lit to enhance the mood. Through all of Dupree’s nasty shenanigans Molly appears to be ever forgiving with the patience of an angel who somehow takes it all in stride, and even forms a bond with Dupree at the anger and disbelief of her husband (or audiences for that matter) who is so busy working hard at making a living. You KNOW a man had to have written this script (namely, Mike LeSieur). Any woman in her right mind would have thrown Dupree out in a flash at first sign of his awful behavior.

If all this isn’t enough, hard working project designer Carl has to deal with his boss, father in law, Mr. Thompson (Michael Douglas, looking smooth and fresh faced, thanks to Dr. 90210) a multi-millionaire land developer who doesn’t like him for some reason. Thompson is constantly trying to humiliate and emasculate Carl by undermining his ideas, requesting Carl take his wife’s surname and to go so far as telling him to have a vasectomy. Yet when it comes to meeting Dupree, Thompson thinks he is one cool dude, and invites him on his yacht, a gesture that sets Carl into a jealous rage. Do you blame him?

Is all this funny? There are a few humorous moments, but not enough to save the floundering story. The premise is good, but the manner in which its played out is, at best sophomoric, and the characters are one dimensional, even if the charming Wilson is a natural at playing immature, but lovable fellows. Immature? Got that right. Loveable? I don’t feel it this time around and I am one of his biggest fans. In an interview with Jay Leno, Wilson said his character “is like a family dog who tore up everything, but the family grew to love”. Nope, I beg to disagree. Dogs you can train. Dupree may be into poetry, Audrey Hepburn, Lance Armstrong and bicycling, but that his lack of responsibility stinks and the idea that he has this amazing likeability with a heart of gold when he’s really just an unemployed bum doesn’t ring true. In fact very little about this film does, especially the ridiculous ending (don’t worry, I won’t divulge it) which showcases the valuable lessons on life that Dupree has to offer. That’s a good one!

Poor Oscar nominated (for Crash) Matt Dillon is relegated to frustrated second fiddle and wastes his talent in badly written role. As for Kate Hudson, the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree. Like her mother before her, she is given scenes in which she parades around in skimpy underwear or a bikini and has the camera focusing on her derriere. The one thing that did catch my attention and found strange is why the faces of the other two pivotal women who supposedly have an impact on the men in their lives are always hidden. Is this some kind of anti woman message directed towards married men?

I can’t stand it when I know a movie has potential, but it isn’t fulfilled. Chalk it up as another disappointment that’s destined to be gone in no time. By the looks of it, THIS one won’t overstay its welcome.