The Flick Chicks

Judy Thorburn's Movie Reviews

Godsend

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Judy Thorburn

Godsend

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Flick Chicks Chick-O-Meter The Flick Chicks, film, video, movie reviews, critics, Judy Thorburn, Victoria Alexander, Polly Peluso, Shannon Onstot, Jacqueline Monahan, Tasha ChemplavilFlick Chicks Chick-O-Meter The Flick Chicks, film, video, movie reviews, critics, Judy Thorburn, Victoria Alexander, Polly Peluso, Shannon Onstot, Jacqueline Monahan, Tasha ChemplavilFlick Chicks Chick-O-Meter The Flick Chicks, film, video, movie reviews, critics, Judy Thorburn, Victoria Alexander, Polly Peluso, Shannon Onstot, Jacqueline Monahan, Tasha ChemplavilFlick Chicks Chick-O-Meter The Flick Chicks, film, video, movie reviews, critics, Judy Thorburn, Victoria Alexander, Polly Peluso, Shannon Onstot, Jacqueline Monahan, Tasha ChemplavilFlick Chicks Chick-O-Meter The Flick Chicks, film, video, movie reviews, critics, Judy Thorburn, Victoria Alexander, Polly Peluso, Shannon Onstot, Jacqueline Monahan, Tasha Chemplavil

“GODSEND” – SHOULD BE RETURNED TO ITS MAKER

It really irks me when a movie has an interesting or important subject matter at its core, but winds up with the premise being used for the sole purpose of plot tool.  Godsend is such a case, where cloning is the foundation of the story, but here it is used as a means to create a another run of the mill horror movie that has similarities to The Omen and its sequel Damien, mixed with Audrey Rose.  Only those films excelled as fine thrillers, where this one reaches a dead end after starting off in the right direction.

That’s too bad, because stars Greg Kinnear and Rebecca Romijn Stamos are up to the task of delivering fine performances and deserve a script worthier than the one they are given. Ditto for DeNiro.  Rebecca was especially impressive in her first REAL acting role (the Punisher part wasn’t demanding) shows she is more than that model pretty face and body.

The stars play a young affluent married couple, Paul and Jessie Duncan, who are obviously in love, because they can’t keep their hands off each other. That’s nice. The product of their union is sweet mannered son Adam (Cameron Bright) who, shortly after his eight birthday, dies tragically in an accident during a shopping trip in the city with his mother.  At the funeral, genetic research scientist/doctor Richard Wells (a goateed Robert De Niro) sees this as perfect timing and as an opportunity to approach the grieving parents with an offer to bring back the one child that meant everything to them.  Using cells from Adam, he says he can create a genetically identical fetus in Jessie’s womb – in essence, a clone of their little boy.  Problem is, this procedure is illegal, not to mention the moral and ethical questions that remain.  But those issues fall by the wayside, when the important angle is to turn this movie into a scary horror tale, or at least make an effort.  Paul and Jessie don’t want to think about the ramifications. All they care about is getting their son back at whatever cost, no matter what.  So they go ahead with the offer.  And, after Adam number two is born, they move to a mansion in the suburbs, and start over.  Only this child is more than they ever dreamed for.

Adam seems normal until shortly after his eighth birthday, the same age of the original Adam’s death, when things start to go terribly wrong.  What starts off as night terrors and visions of an evil spirit, soon accelerates into strange and hostile behavior and violent acts directed at a student from his school.   Questions arise whether Adam is having memories of his death, or if another spirit has taken possession, and why?  So, Paul, not wanting to lose another son, digs deep into whatever information he can find to get the answer.

Godsend had my attention for about a half hour. But, as soon as it turned to pure shock value I realized this was going to be a disappointment. No real issues were addressed. DeNiro has a speech about opening Pandora’s box, but rationalizes his responsibility as being in cahoots with G-d who made man with the ability to clone. That’s about as intellectually deep as it gets!

But is it scary, you want to know?  If you don’t mind seeing the same scare tactics used over and over again, maybe you will get a thrill or two.  I just sat in disbelief over the numerous plot holes and ridiculous blunders.  I will never understand how a film that lacks credibility in its continuity can be released that way. For instance, Paul has a confrontation with the mad doctor Wells in a church. The doctor hits him over the head with a heavy candelabra causing bleeding and unconsciousness, and leaves him for dead, while the church goes up in blazes. The next scene Paul, with no visible wound, blood, or pain, is saving his wife from being axed to death. Nothing is discussed, case closed, like it never happened.  Helloooo, something is missing here. Are we, the audience, supposed to be brain dead, and forget the previous sequence?  Really!

But, what’s worse is we are left with an atrocious ending that leaves us with a terrible message about blind love and parental irresponsibility.  That was a surprise I didn’t expect, and which was not very satisfying.  From the way it is left off, we may even be in for a sequel. Heavens, no!  As far as I am concerned, it would just be one clone too many!